soups stews and chili

Sambar Lentil Curry

A dish passed on from generation to generation in Indian kitchens, Sambar is a popular Southern Indian lentil-based curry starring the rich flavour of a unique spice blend (Sambar Seasoning) that’s made with lentils and bold flavours like McCormick Gourmet™ Coria... A dish passed on from generation to generation in Indian kitchens, Sambar is a popular Southern Indian lentil-based curry starring the rich flavour of a unique spice blend (Sambar Seasoning) that’s made with lentils and bold flavours like McCormick Gourmet™ Coriander and Club House® Cumin Seed. Warm and comforting, it’s a must-have addition on your Indian-inspired date night menu. Read More Read Less
20 min
PREP TIME
1h 15 min
COOK TIME
24
INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS 4 SERVINGS

  • Sambar Seasoning
  • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) moong dal (split yellow mung bean)
  • 6 dried red chilies , (such as bird's eye chilies), stemmed
  • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) Coriander Seed
  • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) dried curry leaves
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons (7 grams) Cumin Seed
  • 1 teaspoon (5 milliliters) Fennel Seed
  • 1 teaspoon (5 milliliters) Pepper, Whole Black
  • 2 tablespoons (30 milliliters) Ground Turmeric
  • Sambar Lentil Curry
  • 6 cups (1.5 liters) water , divided
  • 1 cup (250 milliliters) moong dal (split yellow mung bean)
  • 2 tablespoons (30 milliliters) ghee Substitution Available
    • vegetable ghee
  • 2/3 cup (150 milliliters) diced carrot , (about 1/2-inch/1-cm pieces)
  • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) finely chopped shallots
  • 2 tablespoons (30 milliliters) finely chopped fresh garlic
  • 1 1/2 cups (375 milliliters) diced tomatoes , (about 1/2-inch/1-cm pieces)
  • 2 tablespoons (30 milliliters) Sambar Seasoning
  • 1 cup (250 milliliters) diced eggplant , (about 1/2-inch/1-cm pieces)
  • 2/3 cup (150 milliliters) sliced okra , (about 1/2-inch/1-cm pieces)
  • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) tamarind paste
  • 2 tablespoons (30 milliliters) brown sugar
  • 4 1/2 teaspoons (22 milliliters) salt
  • 1 cup (250 milliliters) chopped green beans , (about 1/2-inch/1-cm pieces)
  • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) chopped fresh cilantro
  • 4 small naan breads , quartered, toasted

Preparation

  • 1 Heat large skillet on medium-high heat. Add dal; toast 2 to 3 minutes. Add chilies, coriander and curry leaves; toast 2 to 3 minutes longer. Stir in cumin, fennel and peppercorns; toast 2 minutes longer or until fragrant. Remove mixture from skillet. Cool completely.
  • 2 Transfer toasted dal mixture to spice grinder or food processor. Pulse until finely ground. Sift mixture using fine mesh sieve, discarding any large pieces of husk or pith. Add turmeric and mix until well blended. Store Sambar Seasoning in airtight container.
  • 3 For the Curry, place 3 cups (750 ml) of the water and dal in medium saucepan. Bring to boil on high heat; reduce heat and simmer until tender, about 30 to 35 minutes. Drain any remaining liquid. Transfer cooked dal to food processor and pulse until mixture is a smooth paste. Set aside.
  • 4 Melt ghee in large saucepan on medium-high heat. Add carrots and shallots, cook and stir until shallots are translucent, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add garlic and ginger; cook 1 minute or until fragrant. Stir in tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes or until tomatoes have softened. Stir in Sambar Seasoning, cooking just until fragrant.
  • 5 Stir in remaining 3 cups (750 ml) water, eggplant, okra, tamarind paste, brown sugar and salt. Bring to simmer; cook until thickened, about 12 to 15 minutes. Add green beans and reserved dal paste, stirring to mix well. Cook until heated through and mixture is slightly thickened. Ladle hot curry into serving bowls, garnish with cilantro and serve with warm naan bread.
  • 6 Test Kitchen Tips:
    • What is moong dal (mung dal)? Dal in the ancient language of Sanskrit means “to split.” That being said, in Hindi dal typically refers to both an ingredient—split, dried beans, lentils or peas—as well as the dish made with them. Moong dal is the split, dried mung bean, with its green shell removed, typically used in South-Asian cooking.
    • Curry Leaves are an herb native to India and often used in South Indian cooking. Curry leaf plants have aromatic glossy, pointed green leaves with a slightly bitter-sweet, pungent citrusy flavor, said to be reminiscent of lemongrass or anise. Curry leaves are often added to oil at the beginning of the cooking process to create a flavorful base. Though some dishes are best prepared using whole leaves which are then removed, the leaves are completely edible and other dishes, like this Vada recipe, do not require you to remove the leaves once cooked. It’s important to note that curry leaves are not at all related to curry powder. You can find curry leaves in Indian and Asian markets as well as through online retailers like Amazon.

NUTRITION INFORMATION

(per Serving)

Nutrition information coming soon

RELATED RECIPES

REVIEWS