Club House Thanksgiving | Survey

Club House Thanksgiving | Survey

1 in 5 (22%) of Canadians are foreign-born (StatCA). A deeper dive shows that 16% of new Canadians have arrived since 2011 and top foreign countries include India, China, and the Philippines.

As of last reporting, Canada’s population grew by 76,000 in the first three months of 2020, with 82% of the growth coming from immigration (CICNews1 | CICNews2).

This Thanksgiving, we want to celebrate with all Canadians by highlighting the diverse food that fills their Thanksgiving table and encouraging families to enjoy a meal with meaning, thanks to Club House. To uncover twists on traditional Thanksgiving menus, we conducted an online survey of 1000 new Canadians (arrived in Canada less than 12 years ago) of Chinese (n=336), Indian (n=336), and Filipino (n=335) descent, completed between August 25 to Sept. 7, 2020.

 

1. Almost all new Canadians celebrate Canadian Thanksgiving1, nearly half of whom are blending traditional Canadian Thanksgiving dishes with dishes that represent their cultural heritage2. In addition, half of new Canadians are cooking turkey as their main course3.

  1. Most (81%) new Canadians of Chinese, South Asian, or Filipino origin say they have celebrated Canadian Thanksgiving (or Fall Weekend).
  2. Four-in-ten (41%) new Canadians celebrate Thanksgiving with a mix of typical Canadian Thanksgiving dishes and traditional dishes from their heritage.
  3. Half (51%) of new Canadians say they will be eating turkey as part of their Thanksgiving meal this year.

2. The longer new Canadians have been in Canada, the more likely they are to celebrate Thanksgiving - and the longer here, the more likely they are to host their own celebration, rather than attending a celebration elsewhere1.

  1. Of the new Canadians who have arrived in Canada within the last 5 years, 29% said they’d host a meal. Of the new Canadians who have arrived in Canada in the last 6-11 years, 41% said they’d host a meal.

3. While almost half of new Canadians are celebrating Thanksgiving with a mix of typical Canadian Thanksgiving dishes and traditional dishes from their heritage1, a third are celebrating Thanksgiving entirely with traditional food from their heritage2. Finally, a fifth of new Canadians are cooking entirely typical Canadian Thanksgiving meals3.

  1. Four-in-ten (41%) new Canadians celebrate Thanksgiving with a mix of typical Canadian Thanksgiving dishes and traditional dishes from their heritage.
  2. Three-in-ten (29%) say they serve a traditional meal tied to their heritage (especially those in Quebec and who do not plan on eating turkey).
  3. Two-in-ten (22%) expect to see a typical Canadian Thanksgiving meal on their table (particularly those outside of Quebec, men, and those planning on turkey being served).

4. Half of new Canadians incorporate turkey into their celebratory Thanksgiving meals1.

  1. While half (51%) of new Canadians say they will be eating turkey for Thanksgiving, 36% say they will not. For 28%, that’s because they don’t like or eat turkey, two-in-ten (17%) say it’s because they are vegetarian, and fewer say it’s not a tradition for them (9%), or a turkey is too big and their family is small (8%). Those who are of South Asian descent are significantly more likely to say they won’t eat turkey because they are vegetarian (32%) or vegan (6%) compared to 1% of those who are Chinese or Filipino.

5. For new Canadians, tradition is a primary reason they cook beloved dishes for Thanksgiving, seconded by the taste and flavor of the dish1.

  1. Two-thirds (65%) say there is a reason they choose certain dishes to serve at their Thanksgiving celebration, with three-in-ten (27%) saying it is tradition or a symbol of celebration. Two-in-ten prepare the dish because it tastes good and is a favourite of theirs, while 11% say the food is part of their culture/ heritage. Those of Chinese or Filipino heritage (vs. South Asian), and new Canadians planning on eating turkey at Thanksgiving (vs. those who are not) are significantly more likely to cite that the dish represents tradition and symbol of the celebration.

 

New Canadians are changing the typical Canadian Thanksgiving table, weaving their own cultural backgrounds into the tastes of the holiday. All Canadians will gather differently this year, but both newly arrived Canadians as well as those who have been here for generations, will find that traditional dishes – be they typically Canadian or not – remind us of who we are and how far we’ve come. Club House is integral to this holiday, providing flavors that both bring back and create memories.